UN: Air Pollution – Know your enemy

“We can’t stop breathing. But we can do something about the quality of our air, and global action is growing at all levels. To have any chance of truly changing the air, however, we need to know our enemy better and what we can do to defeat it.”

UN Environment recently published a new article discussing air pollution and how to tackle it. In the article they claim that nine out of ten people worldwide are statistically exposed to levels of air pollutants which exceed what the World Health Organization regards as safe. This means that with almost every breath we take, we are inhaling tiny particles which attack your organs and can lead to problems such as respiratory disease, heart disease, stroke and poor mental health.

While ambient (outdoor) air pollution is a major issue worldwide, My Health My Home was pleased to see mention of indoor air pollution and how this also is a contributor to the air pollution problem.

UN Environment lists the following sources as causes of both outdoor and indoor air pollution:

  • Burning of fossil fuels
  • Industrial processes, such as those of the chemical and mining industries
  • Agriculture
  • Waste treatment and management, particularly landfills
  • Dirty indoor cooking and heating systems
  • Natural processes such as volcanic eruptions and dust storms

All of these sources spread substances including carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxide, ground-level ozone, particulate matter, sulphur dioxide, hydrocarbons and lead. How much of this we end up breathing in, depends on a number of factors. These include weather and time of day. Rush hour may seem an obvious source of local air pollution, but air pollution travels, sometimes even across continents on international weather patterns. Air pollution is a global issue and everyone is at risk.

While you may not be entirely in control over what goes on outside of your home, something you can change is the quality of the air where you spend 90% of your time. Indoor air pollution comes as a result of a build-up of pollutants within the home. This can occur due to a number of reasons, the main being poor ventilation within your home. According to the World Health Organisation, poor indoor air quality is responsible for around 99,000 European deaths a year.

Some ways you can improve the indoor air of your home includes:

  • Assuring your home has an adequate ventilation system installed and running
  • Use eco-friendly cleaning products which releases fewer toxins into the air of your home
  • Dry your washing outside, or in a very well ventilated room – this will reduce the build-up of moisture

For a full list of our top tips on how to improve your indoor air quality press here.

Read the full UN Environment Article here.

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