Indoor Air Quality on EU Building Agenda for First Time

MEPs will debate amendments to new EU building regulations next week (October 11th), which could see indoor air quality become a mandatory criteria for the first time.

The plans come as part of a larger rethink on future building standards in the wake of the Paris Agreement on climate change, and are intended as part of improving the overall energy performance of the built environment.

The Energy Performance of Buildings Directive (EPBD) will be going before the committee on industry, research and energy (ITRE) on the 11th October. The proposed policy changes are intending to ensure all EU citizens have access to the best indoor air quality and will seek to set high minimum standards at the member state level, along with ambitious renovation strategies.

“Energy efficiency and indoor air quality must go hand in hand. The consequences poor indoor air quality has on Europeans’ health and quality of life, as well as on our economies, cannot be underestimated,” according to Roberta Savli, director of strategy and policy at the European Federation of Allergies and Airways Diseases Patients’ Associations (EFA).

“Europeans have the right to breathe clean and safe air everywhere,” she said and adds, “the European Parliament has the opportunity to introduce an indoor air quality certificate to protect us.”

But potential conflicts between the energy efficiency measures and proposed indoor air quality standards are already becoming apparent. Attempts to increase the energy efficiency of buildings generally mean “we are not opening windows; we are interchanging incoming and outgoing air” according to Jaromir Kohlicek, a Czech MEP and vice-chair of the ITRE committee.


Achieving the balance between a high level legislative framework and member state commitment for ambitious renovation strategies and action plans will be essential to see significant progress on the issue.

Adrian Joyce, secretary general of the European Alliance of Companies for Energy Efficiency in Buildings (EuroACE), admits that to “live up to the Paris Accords we have to change.”

He points out that buildings consume 40 percent of all energy and produce 36 percent of carbon dioxide emissions and 70 percent of all buildings were constructed before there were energy regulations.

The amendments must set a “strong vision for the building stock for 2050”, but he highlighted the “need to strengthen renovation strategies at the member state level”.

Achieving the balance between a high level legislative framework and member state commitment for ambitious renovation strategies and action plans will be essential to see significant progress on the issue.

The amendments sets a framework that, “defines responsibilities and allows member states to create their path to the overall 2050 goal,” according to EuroACE, “this is positive for the member states”. “If these amendments are adopted it means we will see much lower energy demand and much lower carbon dioxide emissions from buildings by 2050.”


Affordability will continue to be an issue. Financial support packages at the EU and member state level must be encouraged, according to Jaatteenmaki.

Kohlicek said that the intent of the changes, with respect to energy poverty and health outcomes, were such that “the declaration is quite clear, we must help the impoverished”.

“When you are living in better homes the heating costs are lower,” Kohlicek said.

Properly renovated and insulated buildings lose less heat and use less energy overall, meaning fewer decisions about ‘whether to heat or eat’. “We hope with these directives, we can push the entrepreneurs who own these buildings to fix the issues,” he comments.


But Kohlicek offers a word of caution, stating “the direct impact of indoor air quality will not be readily apparent”. It could take as long as ten years to see a statistical change, he warns, as these directives are for new buildings and future renovations. “This is a policy with a long view”.

 

This article originally appeared on EU Observer, 05/10/2017

https://euobserver.com/health/139297

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s